URBAN DESIGN AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

URBAN DESIGN AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE

This department at ARUCAD focuses on the protection, enhancement, restoration and creation of green spaces in urbanized areas. Students will acquire invaluable knowledge and skills for creating functional and aesthetic spaces, preserving biodiversity, stabilizing the soil, combating noise and air pollution, regulating the urban climate, and improving the quality of life of citizens.

Architectural bureaus
Botanical gardens
Municipal or private parks
Municipal institutions for urban planning
Municipal institutions for environmental conservation
Construction companies
Tourist sites
Landscape design firms
Consulting firms
NPOs associated with environmental conservation

BRIEFLY
  • Medium of Instructions English
  • Programme Duration 4 YEARS
  • English Preparatory School YES
Academic Staff Academic Staff
Programme Curriculum Programme Curriculum

DEPARTMENT OF URBAN DESIGN AND LANDSCAPE ARCHITECTURE
CONTENT OF THE COURSES AND BOOKS TO BE USED

FIRST YEAR
FIRST SEMESTER

UDLA 101 Studio 1 (2-8) 6
This first design studio course is structured to introduce the students to the design process and explains the context; content, tools, studio culture, and work methodology to activate the design studio environment and explore the design language through different means of working in an abstract manner. It is prepared within the scope of basic design principles application, formal ordering systems, and geometric manipulations. It aims to transfer the use of a range of tools, skills in communication, research, cultural and contextual studies through a series of theoretical and practical bases for working and developing ideas. With a focus on “self and environment” students will engage with the physical body (mass) and space and place through a spatial experience. Investigating various techniques of transformations and controlled articulation of the mass, student perceptions are used to heighten and influence the development of their observation skills and knowledge of the tool’s design. Art and design installations will be created as a group or individual works and the main project will be supported by several short-term workshops, seminars, research, and presentations.

UDLA 109 Research Methods and Discourses (2-2) 3
The course introduces a systematic approach to conducting research, from developing a research question via critically reading scholarly texts to writing own scholarly texts. It introduces general methodologies of research and discusses a broad spectrum of disciplines that might be used as specific methods/tools in design-related research, such as philosophy, sociology, and anthropology.

INAD 107 Cultural & Contextual Studies I (3-0) 3
This course focuses on the design and art of ancient cultures of the Mediterranean, central Europe and the Middle East, from prehistory to the early Byzantine and early Islamic periods. It provides a framework through a chronological survey, covering architecture, landscaping, gardening, sculpture, painting, furniture and minor crafts, being linked to the cultural, political, religious, socio-economic and technological contexts and their agents. The course builds up a sound knowledge of key monuments and works of art. It develops the necessary skills to diagnose stylistic trends of ancient design and art and to define their characteristics, such as typology, iconography, material and technique. Finally, it introduces theories of design/art, preparing the students for a reflective critical assessment. The course addresses students of design.

UDLA 103 Design Communication 1 (2-2) 3
This course teaches the fundamentals of drawing and sketching and introduces core competencies in Computer Aided Design and Drafting and provides students with the ability to communicate the visual and technical detail of a design through accurate three-dimensional (3D) models and technical drawings for manufacture. The primary motive of this discipline is for the students to craft effective and expressive ways to share ideas with others, using an approach focusing on both problem-solving and persuasion. By experimenting with a variety of media techniques and tools in their design practice, students will enhance their ability to conceptualize, develop, and communicate design ideas and potential outcomes.

UDLA 105 Introduction to Landscape Architecture (2-0) 2
This course provides a basic knowledge of landscape architecture as a profession and academic discipline, its interrelation with other disciplines, its history, scope and general issues of landscape architecture discipline, landscape design and planning vocabularies. Additionally, the course focuses on the design continuum of living landscapes from the wilderness, to rural landscapes and urban landscapes. Within this context; the basic landscape design concepts and principles are also taught to students. Learning outcomes of this course include understanding of the scope and major themes of the landscape architecture profession, knowledge and ability of the landscape design process.

UDLA 001 Colloquium 1 (0-0) 0
The colloquium aims to expose students to issues of design outside the classroom and provide exposure to different design thinking both among their peers within their departments and other students in the faculty of design. The colloquium is repeated every semester except the last semester.

SOFL 101 Academic English I (3-0) 3
Students who regularly attend this course will have the opportunity to practice a variety of study skills, including but not limited to setting goals, organizing, using time, concentrating, and taking notes. Students will be given important articles written in modern-day English and students will learn to discuss and write responses at an academic level. At the end of the lessons, each student will be able to derive the meaning of unknown words in a reading text, write paragraphs and articles, summarize, discuss and write reply letters.

FIRST YEAR
SECOND SEMESTER

UDLA 102 Studio 2 (2-8) 6
A continuation of Studio 1, this second-semester architectural design studio focuses on the student’s expanded vocabulary of architectural fundamentals, conceptual development through learning experiences that develop their expressional skills. Students will develop their knowledge of the notion of scale, order, nature of materials and ergonomics. They will familiarize themselves with the application of basic design principles and the versatility of organization and ordering systems in a plan, section and mixed representations as well as develop their conceptual approach to the design resolve. The studio design brief will explore the effects of architectural elements on the voids they form, and the experiential connections and contradictions made between interior and exterior environments, and the techniques of translating information into from. All basic principles and elements that fall within the scope of visual and verbal perception and expression are transferred to students through theoretical and experimental practice to develop an analytical process for design. Students are also introduced to environmental and social responsibilities.
Pre-requisite: UDLA 101.

UDLA 104 Design Communication 2 (2-2) 3
This module develops the core 2 and 3- dimensional visual communication skills covered in UDLA 103, enabling students to demonstrate significant ability and understanding in how to generate and manipulate 2D and 3D visuals and forms. Digital illustration and rendering techniques will also be covered within this course.

INAD 108 Cultural & Contextual Studies 2 (3-0) 3
This course focuses on the design and art of western and eastern cultures, from the Middle Ages to the Baroque period, including the Selcuk and Ottoman periods. It provides a framework through a chronological survey, covering, architecture, gardening, sculpture, painting, furniture, and minor crafts being linked to the cultural, political, religious, socio-economic and technological contexts and their agents. The course builds up a sound knowledge of key monuments and works of art. It develops the necessary skills to diagnose stylistic trends of the design and art of the mentioned cultures and/or periods and to define their characteristics, such as typology, iconography, material, and technique. Finally, it introduces theories of design/art, enhancing the students’ reflective critical assessment. The course addresses students of design.

UDLA 106 Theory of Landscape Architecture (3-0) 3
This course introduces students to an understanding of nature as the base for all human activities, the planning constraints imposed by the forms, forces, and features of nature and our built environment. The major themes of the course comprise the human habitat, climate as a response, land and water as a resource, topography, vegetation and landscape planting, structures in the landscapes, landscape character, site selection and analysis, etc. The contemporary thinking approaches in the planning of human habitations are introduced. The course guides the creation of more efficient and pleasant places.

UDLA 110 Ecology and Design (3-0) 3
This course introduces the concept of ecology and possible approaches to integrate it into the design. Sustainable/ecological design is explained as a design approach based on the natural system’s functioning. Ecology, sustainable design, sustainable urban, and regional design are among the themes that will be studied.

UDLA 002 Colloquium 2 (0-0) 0
This colloquium aims to expose students to issues of design outside the classroom and provide exposure to different design thinking both among their peers within their departments and other students in the faculty of design. The colloquium is repeated every semester except the last semester.

SOFL 102 Academic English II (3-0) 3
It is a continuation of the Academic English I course. Students who regularly attend this course will have the opportunity to practice many study skills, including but not limited to setting goals, organizing, using time, concentrating, and taking notes. Students will be given important articles written in contemporary English, and students will learn to discuss and write responses at an academic level. At the end of the lessons, each student will be able to understand the meaning of unknown words in a reading passage and write paragraphs and articles.

SECOND YEAR
THIRD SEMESTER

UDLA 203 Digital Tools in Design (2-2) 3
This course aims to introduce and discuss the history of computers and the emergence of digital tools. While surveying the digital perspective in the physical and social environment, basic forms of computational and interactive design are experimented. Students will develop an awareness of design possibilities through implementing open-source digital tools in their design processes. The phase from basic digital language and tools to composed designs interacting with the human senses and how the digital and mixed technology improved architectural use of materials, structure, and space will be examined.

INAD 209 Cultural & Contextual Studies 3 (3-0) 3
This course focuses on the modern and postmodern design and art, ranging from the Industrial Revolution and Enlightenment to the end of the 20th century. It provides a framework through a chronological survey, covering architecture, landscape architecture and urban design, sculpture, painting, furniture, industrial and graphic design, being linked to the cultural, political, religious, socio-economic and technological contexts and their agents. The course builds up a sound knowledge of key monuments and works of design and art. It develops the necessary skills to diagnose stylistic trends of the design and art of the mentioned timeframe and to define their characteristics, such as typology, iconography, material, and technique. Finally, it introduces modern and postmodern theories of design/art, enhancing the students’ reflective critical assessment. The course addresses students of design.

UDLA 201 Plant Materials 1 (1-2) 2
This course attempts to provide a detailed study of the identification and use of evergreen ornamental trees and shrubs to express relevant design principles and functions in the landscape. The course introduces design applications and uses of evergreen plants in the landscape as an evergreen vertical design element.

UDLA 205 Landscape Project 1 (2-4) 4
The primary aim of this course is to comprise landscape architectural design methodologies, the design process and relevant stages, landscape design materials, concept development, creation of space through the use of landform, vegetation and structures, graphic, verbal and written communication. These issues are analyzed on a selected site to develop students’ technical skills and knowledge.

UDLA 207 Landscape Ecology (3-0) 3
Landscape ecology concerns with the analysis of environmental factors, ecosystem functions, and ecosystem dynamics, as related to decision-making for landscape planning and design. The ecology of the landscapes, regions, or other large heterogeneous areas is the study of how landscape patterns influence the processes that determine the abundance and distribution of plants and animals. The spatial pattern or structure of a landscape is a mosaic made of various elements. The course focuses on the interaction of landscape science with the necessities and mechanisms of the human environment.

AITT/HIST 201 Atatürk’s Principles and History of Turkish Revolution I (2-0) 2
Atatürk’s Principles and History of Turkish Revolution course; telling students how to establish the circumstances under which the Republic of Turkey, forming the government intends to adopt the basic principles of Ataturk. The reason why his principles were transferred to the field of application is explained with case studies that not only the Turkish Nation but also the whole of humanity need more than ever.

TUDI/TURK 201 Turkish Language I (2-0) 2
The aim of the course is to comprehend the structure and functioning characteristics of the mother tongue to every young person studying in higher education and to gain the ability to use Turkish correctly and beautifully as a means of written and oral expression in terms of language-thought connection. Another goal is to make a unifying and integrative language prevailing in teaching and to raise young people who have native language awareness.

UDLA 003 Colloquium 3 (0-0) 0
This colloquium aims to expose students to issues of design outside the classroom and provide exposure to different design thinking both among their peers within their departments and other students in the faculty of design. The colloquium is repeated every semester except the last semester.

SECOND YEAR
FOURTH SEMESTER

UDLA 204 Digital Tools in Design 2 (2-2) 3
Continuation of Digital Tools in Architecture 1, this course continues to develop the students’ knowledge of basic theoretical and practical foundations of digital practice to explore and apply theories, media, and techniques for engagement in architectural designs. The course addresses issues influencing the architectural work developed through digital tools, such as design theories, digital media, digital design techniques, computational concepts, rule-based design processes and operational paradigms. Through the theoretical and practical study of digital tools and processes, their application to the designed built environment will be examined. Regarding the conceptualization, exploration, production, and ultimate representation of architecture, the collaborative work of multi-disciplinary use of modeling techniques, experiment with advanced geometric concepts using parametric design to explore and investigate new materials and structures in architectural design. Pre-requisite: UDLA 203.

UDLA 208 Introduction to Urban Concepts (3-0) 3
This course focuses on various urban concepts, urbanism, and the major tools for analyzing the urban environment. In addition, the relationships between different spatial disciplines (architecture, landscape architecture and urban design) are analyzed. The students are expected to be equipped with theoretical and practical knowledge in the fields of urban planning, urban design, urban policy, regional planning, and other relevant issues.

UDLA 202 Plant Materials 2 (1-2) 2
This course is an introduction to the identification and recognition, as well as design applications and uses of deciduous trees and shrubs in the landscape. It introduces the use of deciduous trees and shrubs as design elements in the landscape, from the rural/urban scale to the site-specific scale. The course examines the spatial, visual, functional and sensory qualities of deciduous vegetation, as well as the interplay with ecological functions. Besides, the course covers identification and use of native or culture herbaceous ornamental plants (e.g. bulbous plants, ground covering plants, outdoor plants, indoor plants, cut flowers, herbaceous bordures); use of herbaceous plants in plant composition, and establishment and maintenance of lawn areas.

UDLA 206 Landscape Project 2 (2-4) 4
The students are required to use their gained skills in planning and designing various areas starting from the smallest areas such as residential gardens up to urban parks. They are responsible for completing different projects at different scales and contents during the term. Pre-requisite: UDLA 205.

UDLA 210 Urban Ecology (3-0) 3
This course introduces the core concepts, ecological patterns and processes within the urban setting, and vocabulary of contemporary urban ecology, and the scientific basis for creating both viable and sustainable cities. Urban ecology describes all aspects of urban environments, the interaction of the built and natural environment, ecology of the city, and application of the concept of urban ecology to land-use planning. A variety of topics, such as urbanization and human domination of Earth, ecosystem and human dimensions in cities, relevant planning tools and policies (e.g. green infrastructure and land use planning), will be studied within the context of the course. Critical readings and discussions will enable students to increase their ability to analyze ecological systems and processes.

UDLA 212 Internship 1 (0-0) 0
Students work in landscape architectural offices and/or greenhouses to develop their theoretical knowledge and practical skills (20 days).

AITT/ HIST 202 Atatürk’s Principles and History of Turkish Revolution II (2-0) 2
Atatürk’s Principles and History of Turkish Revolution course; telling students how to establish the circumstances under which the Republic of Turkey, forming the government intends to adopt the basic principles of Ataturk. The reason why his principles were transferred to the field of application is explained with case studies that not only the Turkish Nation but also the whole of humanity needs more than ever.

TUDI/ TURK 202 Turkish Language II (2-0) 2
The aim of the course is to comprehend the structure and functioning characteristics of the mother tongue to every young person studying in higher education and to gain the ability to use Turkish correctly and beautifully as a means of written and oral expression in terms of language-thought connection. Another goal is to make a unifying and integrative language prevailing in teaching and to raise young people who have native language awareness.

UDLA 004 Colloquium 4 (0-0) 0
This colloquium aims to expose students to issues of design outside the classroom and provide exposure to different design thinking both among their peers within their departments and other students in the faculty of design. The colloquium is repeated every semester except the last semester.

THIRD YEAR
FIFTH SEMESTER

UDLA 301 Landscape Planning (3-0) 3
This course introduces students to the programmatic, artistic, and technical aspects of landform and topographic adjustments to accommodate various human uses. Topics include pedestrian and vehicular circulation, conservation and addition of plant materials, movement of water, recreational facilities, and creation of attractive views and blocking the unpleasant ones. Sculptural landforms will be emphasized through the use of topographic plans, sections, and contour models. The course stresses the shaping and coordination of ideas from initial concept to complete design product.

UDLA 305 Resource Analysis and Management (3-0) 3
This course addresses both theory and application and provides the students a dynamic analytical framework within which temporal and spatial data and information is gathered, integrated, interpreted, and manipulated. It also introduces the students to the rapidly expanding field of Geographic Information Systems (GIS). Topics include the scientific basis of sustainability explored through the study of natural resources and the built environment; physical/ecological processes and systems, and human impacts from the global scale to local resource use.

UDLA 307 Landscape Construction and Engineering 1 (2-2) 3
This course introduces the visual and physical characteristics of landscape construction materials including, but not limited to, stone, brick, concrete, metal, asphalt, and wood etc. Students also learn to utilize standard sources of information on building materials and the terminology typically utilized when choosing and specifying construction materials. They become familiar with dimensional standards for landscape structures, including pavements, stairs, furnishings, retaining walls, freestanding walls, fences, decks, and small overhead structures. Topographic features, scales, and types of maps as well as meaning and expression of scale in addition to slope and grading are also among the topics of the course.

UDLA 309 Planting Design (2-2) 3
The primary objective of the course is to process the gained knowledge of plant material for analyzing horticultural, functional, and aesthetic objectives to meet design requirements. The course aims to provide plant composition and design principles and practices to encourage the ability of students to visualize planting and composition ideas.

UDLA 303 Architecture and the City (2-0) 2
This course aims to observe the structure of the cities and the ways they are changing or can be changed. It also presents the theories of city formation, evolution, and transformation. It explores the principles of urban form and the philosophy of urban design and planning. The course is composed of theoretical modules and discussion periods and practical modules that include field trips, surveys, analysis, and projects.

UDLA 005 Colloquium 5 (0-0) 0
This colloquium aims to expose students to issues of design outside the classroom and provide exposure to different design thinking both among their peers within their departments and other students in the faculty of design. The colloquium is repeated every semester except the last semester.

THIRD YEAR
SIXTH SEMESTER

UDLA 302 Urban Landscape Planning and Design (2-2) 3
This course aims to provide the students with a general understanding, practical skills, and theoretical knowledge in planning and designing different urban landscapes such as public squares, green infrastructure, the built environment, resilient and sustainable cities.

UDLA 304 Landscape Management (3-0) 3
This course aims to develop the ability to make planning and design decisions based on sound landscape management and maintenance practices through understanding and application of fundamental principles of ecology and landscape ecology. The major themes of the course comprise environmental degradation and ecological concepts, landscape ecology, habitat fragmentation, green infrastructure and ecosystem services, ecological corridors, large and small scale site design, and maintenance principles.

UDLA 306 Landscape Construction and Engineering 2 (2-2) 3
The course aims to improve the ability of the students to conceptualize the term sustainability, sustainable materials, methods, and to adapt them to site-specific conditions. Variations among regions, sites, and related levels of required construction, as well as environmental considerations, will be emphasized Pre-requisite: UDLA 307.

UDLA 308 Natural Vegetation (2-2) 3

This course focuses on Mediterranean-climate regions in relation to environmental sciences, conservation, policy, planning, management, and/or landscape architecture. Features of island ecosystems, identification, and use of native and cultural vegetation cover of Cyprus, endangered species, species to be preserved are among the main topics.

UDLA 310 Internship 2 (0-0) 0
Students work in landscape architectural offices and/or greenhouses to develop their theoretical knowledge and practical skills (20 days).

UDLA 006 Colloquium 6 (0-0) 0
This colloquium aims to expose students to issues of design outside the classroom and provide exposure to different design thinking both among their peers within their departments and other students in the faculty of design. The colloquium is repeated every semester except the last semester.

FOURTH YEAR
SEVENTH SEMESTER

UDLA 401 Environmental Impact Assessment (3-0) 3
As a tool, Environmental Impact Assessment (EIA) is used to identify the environmental, social and economic impacts of a project prior to decision-making. The course aims to teach prediction methods of environmental impacts at an early stage in project planning and design; ways and means to reduce adverse impacts; shape projects to suit the local environment and present the predictions and options to decision-makers.

UDLA 403 Graduation Project 1 (2-4) 4
Students are responsible of carrying individual projects on selected topics in landscape design. Study will focus on the conceptual frames, theoretical foundations, functional aspects and practical applications of design and planning approaches as well as emerging issues in the discipline. Pre-requisite: UDLA 302 and 306.

UDLA 405 Theory of Social-Ecological Landscape System (3-0) 3
This course focuses on the dynamic understanding of social-ecological landscape systems. The course introduces both disciplinary and interdisciplinary approaches that are important to understand connections and linkages across social and ecological systems. The key themes covered in this course comprise the theory of system, the historical development of system theory, system thinking, the social-ecological system theory, and resilience of social-ecological systems and landscapes.

FOURTH YEAR
EIGHTH SEMESTER

UDLA 402 Design of the Built Environment (3-0) 3
A healthy built environment makes a significant contribution to the quality of human health and wellbeing. Within this context, this course is an introduction to the concept of the built environment, its all interrelated aspects, design, planning, and management of functional and aesthetic layouts of built environments, and appropriate solutions regarding the quality and use of the built environments in urban and rural areas.

UDLA 404 Graduation Project 2 (2-4) 4
Within the context of Graduation Project 2, students are required to demonstrate their ability to define a landscape project, to acknowledge the varied scales of resolution appropriate to the task, and to take responsibility for the management of the process to complete the project on schedule. Special emphasis will be given on environmental aspects and new concepts. Pre-requisite: UDLA 403.

UDLA 406 Landscape Rehabilitation Techniques (3-0) 3
This course aims to teach ways and means of handling degraded landscapes. Defining rehabilitation, landscape function analysis, rehabilitating the soil, water, vegetation, destroyed land-forms, rehabilitation approaches, techniques, constructing rehabilitation plans are the main topics. Ecological Restoration approaches, desired vegetation types, forests, woodlands, ecological community descriptions, appropriate planting zones are also considered.

UDLA 408 Vertical Landscape Design (2-0) 2
Vertical landscape design is an approach to manage climate impacts in urban environments, enhance architectural features, and provide particular environmental benefits (e.g. biodiversity and rainwater management). Within this context, this course focuses on the design and installation of different vertical landscape types (e.g. green walls and facades) in urban areas.

DEPARTMENTAL ELECTIVE COURSES

UDLA 311 Sustainable and Resilient Cities (3-0) 3
This course aims to provide students with the theoretical and practical knowledge to design more habitable, resilient, and sustainable regions and cities. The course introduces the concepts of sustainability and resilient cites and their characteristics.

UDLA 313 Environmental Planning and Design (3-0) 3
This course is an introduction to landscape architecture as an environmental planning and design profession. The course provides an understanding of nature as the base for all human activities and describes the planning constraints imposed by the forces, forms, and futures of nature. In addition, the major elements of landscapes (e.g. climate, water, vegetation, and landform), site planning, and landscape planting are among the themes that will be studied.

UDLA 409 Architecture and Landscape (3-0) 3
This course focuses on the relationship between architecture and landscape to design more sustainable and liveable environments. The major topics of the course cover relating architecture to landscape through elements and materials, form, scale, and collaboration.

UDLA 411 Environmental Principles and Policies (3-0) 3
International agreements, protocols, and implementations; national legislation based on the internationally accepted measures, present policies, and also ongoing policy producing efforts for environmental protection are among the main topics.

UDLA 312 Ecological Urbanism (3-0) 3
Ecological urbanism aims to adapt the theory and practice of city design and planning with the insights of ecology. Ecological urbanism is a critical approach to the future of city and its design by addressing challenges that threaten humanity (e.g. global warming). This course is an introduction to the concept of ecological urbanism and relevant principles to design more sustainable and resilient cities.

UDLA 314 Biophilic City Planning and Design (3-0) 3
This course focuses on the background and theory of biophilic cities. The key principles and elements of biophilic cities are explored. The contributions of the biophilic city concept are examined at the base of global successful practices.

UDLA 410 Ornamental Plant Production (2-2) 3
This course provides detailed information on plant material that has ornamental value and relevant propagation techniques: plant propagation; seed, stem cuttings, budding, and grafting. The emphasis will be on the propagation of environmentally sustainable and commercially important species and cultivars.

UDLA 412 Establishment and Maintenance of Lawn (2-2) 3
Cultivar and mixture selection for specific purposes, soil preparation, seeding, fertilization, weed control, aerification, topdressing, mowing, irrigation, equipment and tools, lawn areas for specific purposes are among the main topics of the course.

FACULTY ELECTIVE COURSES

INAD 321 City and History 1 (2-2) 3
This course aims to discuss and analyze core issues of historical and contemporary “town & city” and provide a broad introduction to the historical study of towns and cities from classical to modern times concerning a multi-scalar and interdisciplinary approach.

INAD 322 City and History 2 (2-2) 3
This course is the continuation of the course ‘City and History 1’. The course aims to discuss and analyze core issues of historical and contemporary “town & city” and provide a broad introduction to the historical study of towns and cities from classical to modern times concerning a multi-scalar and interdisciplinary approach.

INAD 323 Reuse and Recycle 1 (2-2) 3
This course, instead of just focusing on techniques and methods of restoration and conservation, focuses on the process of repurposing buildings, both old and historical that have outlived their original purposes. The students in this course also comprehend how to integrate sustainability in their approach to their solutions of design understanding different layers of a building from structure to energy.

INAD 324 Film and Space (2-2) 3
This course aims to develop a critical and analytical point of view to define a context-related methodology. The medium and tools of ‘film’ are important in observing and regenerating a work of design.

INAD 422 Reuse and Recycle 2 (2-2) 3
This course is the continuation of the ANAD 323. This course, instead of just focusing on techniques and methods of restoration and conservation, focuses on the process of repurposing buildings, both old and historical that have outlived their original purposes. The students in this course also comprehend how to integrate sustainability in their approach to their solutions of design understanding different layers of a building from structure to energy.

INDD 321 Organism 1 (2-2) 3
All places that people experience have, to some degree, been shaped by human activity and the connection between natural environment and culture. Therefore, the course has an interdisciplinary focus and covers information available about nature which includes at least the fields of architecture and interior design, psychology, sociology, anthropology, and geography to create a balance with our natural environment.

INDD 421 Light (2-2) 3
This course is a combination of specific principles, established standards and conventions and a number of aesthetic, cultural and human factors applied in an artful manner where energy efficiency and lighting theory and how we can achieve better and meaningful design by light and the application part of it is to come up with creative and innovative solutions to design using the element of light.

INAD 326 Technology 1 (2-2) 3
Art and craft works in which technology plays an important role in their creation will be examined. Investigations on such role will be through weekly group discussions on the examples. For each student a unique (cause-effect-event-object, idea-behavior) knitted organism will be experimented.

UNIVERSITY ELECTIVE COURSES
FMPA 220 Design for Performing Arts (2-2) 3
This course is about scenography, discipline related to any design issue for performing arts productions. Also known as “design for the stage”. It involves with costume lighting and sector space design together. The course aims to give design notions to the performing art students while they are creating dance, theatre and music as well as to the art and design students as an option of designing for performing arts. It is intended to amalgamate design perspectives with performing practices through a certain aesthetic value that completes art production. In this course, students from all departments have the opportunity to think creatively and find design solutions together for the sake of art.

FMPA 221 Icons and Styles of 20th Century Decades (3-0) 3
The culture of western industrial or capitalized society gave birth to the concepts of “icon” and “style” along with “fashion” and “trends”. These terms are very influential on social events, artistic approaches, behavioural manners, organization of living spaces and so on. Therefore, as today’s and future artists and designers it is vital to understand the dynamics of time and change through decades. History of humankind and civilization includes many cornerstones but especially from the contemporary point of view, 20th century decades have affected our time very deeply. This course aims to convey the time flow of 20th century icons and styles which still affects our artistic and creative practices along with the differences between each decade. Student apprehends the historical aspects of artistic practices and appreciates the value of “inspiration” and “retrospective” approaches.

FMPA 222 Performance Art (3-0) 3
Performance Art is an art form or art exhibition of actions enacted by the artist and his/her collaborators. It may be documented or live, includes spontaneously happened events n front of the audience or public. It is traditionally interdisciplinary in the context of both fine arts and performing arts. Generated in 20th century Avant-garde art, it is very powerful in terms of politics and social impacts currently. Its goal is to take public attention to the urgent issues of life and trigger the massive reaction to the wrongness or the sufficiency of the governor or authorities from an aesthetic point of view. Culture of Performance Art course focuses to convey historical overview and guide students to grab notions, criteria and nuances of this art form. This course aims to develop students culturally about Performance Art and enable them to comprehend and discuss the texts about the meanings and influences of this very special art practice.

FMPA 223 Poem (3-0) 3
Poetry is the art form that deals with the words and their meanings and sound or music mutually. It deals with finding appropriate and fewer words to express thoughts and feelings which generates a kind of play in everybody’s mind. Poem is a practice of thinking before writing. It is related with music (sound and rhythm), mathematics, language, and philosophy. Poem is an abstraction, design activity along philosophical effort. Therefore, this course supports the student’s ability of abstract thinking and designing along with imagining and indirect phrasing. It aims to emphasize alternative ways of thinking and creating also encourage students to deal with designing and creating within words which is more intangible than movement, action, and sound. There are poem reading and analysis also writing practices during the course.

FMPA 320 Promoting a Performance (2-2) 3
This course is for all students of the Faculty of Performing Arts and Faculty of Design, Faculty of Art, Faculty of Communication. During the course, students experience to plan, think and design visual components (poster, leaflet, flyer, logo, photo, digital media materials) which are necessary to promote or advertise their theatre, dance, and music creations in collaboration with the other faculty students. In the course, there will be promotion projects which need to be developed as a group. The aim is to share abilities and exchange knowledge about both performing and visualizing in between students of different disciplines. Beyond that, they may understand the nature of their practices mutually and how they may increase creativity if they work as a team.

FMPA 321 Popular Culture (3-0) 3
Popular culture also called mass culture or pop culture indicates a set of practices, beliefs, objects that are dominant or in the foreground in a society at a certain time. These entities influence, attract, motivate, and manipulate people in masses. Related to recognition and fame also those values form the culture of a society by encompassing the activities and feelings produced as a result of popular or dominant objects. In our contemporary life; dance, acting, and music are strong tools like weapons of influencing and directing masses toward certain products, opinions, or choices. Therefore, it is crucial that a creator or practitioner of performing arts should concern the phenomenon of popularity and its results. There is an issue of responsibility of any artist who closely interacts with society. So this theoretical course intends to give students understanding and ethical awareness about popularity and popular culture to find their approaches and take responsibilities over the masses as influencers or creators of popular entities.

FMPA 322 Performance Arts Practices (2-2) 3
This course is the practical component of the Culture of Performance Art course. Students who have taken this prior course are welcome to experience creating live performances concerning contemporary issues. They deal with current problems of our world or society and emerge art actions or live events to raise public awareness about them. There will be projects that students can perform individually and within a group and have the opportunity for public sharing due to collect feedback and evaluate their reactions.

FMPA 420 Site Specific Dance/Theatre/Art (3-0) 3
One of the performing and fine art forms is site-specific ones which are created specifically for a place/space/architecture. In the form of dance, theatre or fine arts the productions are deeply related to the topography and nature of the chosen space (e.g. historical building, junkyard, forest, mountain, train station, abondoned building, warehouse, docks, bus stop, butcher shop, shopping mall) to appreciate its forgotten value or unknown beauty. Artists rehearse there to investigate specifics aspects and value of chosen area and perform in it alive ideally. In this course, students examine the examples of site-specific projects and develop their ideas for the spaces in their local environment. As individuals or group, they will experience how to think alternatively and interacted with the physical environment and appreciate the “space” as a creative collaborator for their projects.

FMPA 421 Creating Video Performance/Art (2-2) 3
In this course, our students will be familiar with the technology (digital tools of recording and editing) and its advantages for sharing their works with the public. Recently these forms are called as digital theatre, digital dance, or digital art. They can be performed as alive or shared as video production. So this course gives students an opportunity of practicing video making and post-production which will be appropriate to share in social media platforms.

FMPA 422 Traditional Street Events II (2-2) 3
This course is the continuation of Traditional Street Events I. It aims to give students a second chance of practicing to reform and revised local cultural dance, theatre, and music samples along with to perform and share with neighborhood alive. This course is also planned to increase touristic attraction in the local environment with modernized traditional art events. Along with it aims to develop cultural awareness in the society about the artistic and historical heritage of our land. As a result of live and in open-air performances of their creations, students get used to performing within close interaction with the audience and enforces their self-confidence as well as quality of performing. Besides this course also give way to relate local community with the members of our faculty as well as to sense the cultural heritage of our geography.
47